Mistabishi Goes On Safari

 

26 Feb 2013

 

 

Mistabishi

 

The Safari EP sees Mistabishi venture towards soca, dancehall and African-influenced beats. We discussed the release with him, finding out more about how he approaches different facets and what led him to the tracks on the EP.

 

Hey Mistabsihi, your new release unleashes some new sounds on us. How have you come to work in the dancehall/soca area?
Well it isn't a dancehall or a soca release. You won't hear it at those parties unless I play at them. I just like that kind of music and whenever I've experienced it, it's always felt like something worth playing with. Like any fast rhythmic music, it sounds amazing outdoors or in a small bunker-room, and those are generally the places I play dance music in.

 

You've always prided yourself on providing something different , so how have you approached this release?
I just wanted some different patterns to play with. There doesn't seem like much point in making d&b, dubstep, techno, house, or anything generic. It's all been done to death several times over now. I can knock out a d&b album in a week now and it feels pointless. So when looking for something new to make for a dancefloor, I just looked to Africa - the recordings of Babatunde Olatunji in particular. That guy mapped the world of rhythm almost
completely.

 

The tracks have an African theme - what's been your inspiration for this?
The entire continent is a big enough inspiration in itself for anyone. Also, Western media-eyes are gonna be fixed on West Africa this year, and not for anything *good* either unfortunately, so I wanted to sample some of its culture before the various institutions that govern me send a load of drones over there and bomb the fucking shit out of it.

 

 

 

Do you have a conception of which market(s) you are aiming for with your releases, or do you leave that to the punters?
Not really. I'm not a marketing or P.R. man. If I was I'd still be on Hospital Records and be making Euro-step. That's the only market I've been anywhere near with my music. The rest of it exists in the wilderness.

 

 

 Where are you going with your music overall? What's next to achieve?
Does it have to go anywhere?! I just make the stuff, and go out with it sometimes. I record for other acts and projects, I have mates with really nice soundsystems to play on, I've got some really lush kit to make records with, and can make and play anything I want ultimately, so I should really explore music far more than I am. I'm not, and nor do I want to be tied and branded with one kind of tune. I couldn't imagine anything worse than that.

 

If you don't actually like music and just want to trade, then it makes sense to pick a niche and mine it for all it's worth. But that's not a priority for me. I will do a Part 2 to this Safari EP coz there's plenty more mileage is the template, but you can only really do one style once I think. Then it just gets boring. I built an LP for the Instra:Mental guys right after leaving Hospital Records that I want to revisit. I was legally forbidden to use my artist name on it back then, so I really wanna take that work and incorporate into the this body of work I have under the Mistabishi name.

 


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